Top News

Supreme Court to determine future of employer arbitration agreements, lower courts divided on issue

David Yates Aug. 15, 2017, 1:39pm

NEW ORLEANS – Earlier this month, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit sided against the National Labor Relations Board, finding that Convergys Corp. has the right to require employees to arbitrate disputes against the company, keeping them from initiating class action lawsuits.

Federal judge finds TC Heartland argument ‘unpersuasive,’ wants patent suit on East Texas docket

David Yates Jul. 20, 2017, 1:33pm

TYLER – The U.S. District Court for Eastern Texas, a favorite venue for patent litigation, will hold on to at least one more patent lawsuit for the time being, as a federal judge recently found a defendant’s TC Heartland argument “unpersuasive.”

Report says patent cases in Texas court may decrease by 1,000 per year after Supreme Court decision

Kacie Whaley Jun. 26, 2017, 1:36pm

WASHINGTON – The Supreme Court's May 22 decision to reduce the states in which patent owners are allowed to file infringement lawsuits is expected to reduce 1,000 cases per year in Eastern Texas and increase cases in the District of Delaware by 500, Unified Patents has predicted.

Supreme Court rejects loose venue interpretation in patent cases

The SE Texas Record Jun. 6, 2017, 4:29pm

“The High Court put a dent in plaintiffs' long-established freedom to shop for the venue of their choosing when pressing patent infringement claims – potentially dealing a blow to the Eastern District of Texas’s prominence in hearing patent cases.” That's the assessment made of a recent U.S. Supreme Court decision by intellectual property firm Morrison & Foerster, and we hope it proves accurate. An end to our prominence in these dubious endeavors would be a good thing and might prompt us to find some more acceptable kind of distinction.

Plain Talk about Law School Rot

Mark Pulliam May 7, 2017, 12:27pm

The legal academy is a strange place. It differs from other intellectual disciplines in that legal scholarship is published mainly in student-edited law reviews, not peer-reviewed journals. Most faculty members at elite law schools have never practiced law, or have done so only briefly and usually without professional distinction. The curricula at many of the nation’s law schools are larded with trendy courses devoted to identity politics and social issues du jour. Elite law schools eschew the teaching of “nuts and bolts” fundamentals, deriding such practical instruction as resembling a “trade school.”

U.S. Supreme Court hears arguments to decide whether to restrict forums for patent infringement actions

Melissa Busch Apr. 24, 2017, 8:43am

WASHINGTON – The U.S. Supreme Court recently heard oral arguments to determine whether patent infringement actions should be restricted to judicial districts where a defendant lives or where the infringement occurred.

Supreme Court ruling may end patent cases in Eastern District courts

Tabitha Fleming Feb. 23, 2017, 3:40pm

WASHINGTON – A closely watched patent case set to be considered by the U.S. Supreme Court may bode major changes for patent trolling cases.

Texas attorney taking U.S. border tactics case to Supreme Court

David Hutton Feb. 14, 2017, 12:24pm

CORPUS CHRISTI – A Texas attorney is taking the case of a 15-year-old Mexican boy killed by a U.S. Border Patrol Agent in a cross-border shooting to the highest court in the United States.

U.S. Supreme Court should reject lower court's loose venue interpretation

The SE Texas Record Feb. 13, 2017, 3:21pm

“When a single district court hears so many cases, not because of convenience or connection to the dispute, but because it is chosen by litigants on one side, the perception of a neutral justice system is undermined.” That's one of several cogent comments made by Texas State Attorney General Ken Paxton and 16 other state AGs in an amicus brief filed last week in a U.S.

New bill to amend collections on abandoned, unclaimed properties by the state of Delaware

Dawn Geske Feb. 8, 2017, 5:23pm

DOVER, Del. – Both the Delaware House and the Senate have passed a bill that determines how the state goes about collecting on abandoned and unclaimed properties.

Neil Gorsuch is Just Round One in the Fight for the Supreme Court

Mark Pulliam Feb. 1, 2017, 1:01pm

President Trump’s nomination of 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals Judge Neil Gorsuch to the U.S. Supreme Court will be met by fierce resistance by Democrats in the Senate and unrelenting demagoguery from left-wing groups and media outlets. About that there can be no doubt. (American Greatness readers may recall a reference to Gorsuch in my December 22 article, “The Trump Court: SCOTUS Could Stand Some Disruption.”)

Supreme Court declines to review Texas Voter ID law case

John Myers Feb. 1, 2017, 12:52pm

WASHINGTON, D.C. – The U.S. Supreme Court recently dealt a blow to Texas' controversial voter identification law.

FAIR proposes immigration plan for President-elect Trump’s first 100 days

Dawn Geske Jan. 2, 2017, 1:49pm

WASHINGTON, D.C. – The Federation for American Immigration Reform (FAIR) has outlined steps for the Trump administration to take to secure the U.S. borders and reform immigration laws upon taking office this month.

Supreme Court rejects Ferguson's Domino theory

The SE Texas Record Nov. 14, 2016, 10:10pm

The lyrics to Van Morrison's 1970 hit sum up pretty well how Provost Umphrey attorney Paul Ferguson Jr. must be feeling, now that the High Court has affirmed the reversal of a $32 million settlement he won against a national pizza chain three years ago.

SCTOUS no help in effort to reinstate $32M verdict against Domino’s

David Yates Nov. 2, 2016, 1:56pm

Last March, the Texas Ninth Court of Appeals axed one of top 100 national jury verdicts of 2013, dismissing Domino’s Pizza from a Beaumont lawsuit brought by Raghurami Reddy.

Attorney Dan Linebaugh recognized by the American Association for Justice

Kathleen McGuire Gilbert Oct. 12, 2016, 10:25am

HOUSTON -- Personal injury attorney Dan Linebaugh, founder and leader of the Linebaugh Law Firm, recently received the American Association for Justice (AAJ) Diplomates of Trial Advocacy designation. This title recognizes attorneys who have demonstrated their ongoing commitment to legal education by completing more than 400 hours of qualifying AAJ educational programs. 

Labor Pains

Mark Pulliam Oct. 5, 2016, 2:52pm

When thinking about the National Labor Relations Board under President Obama, most observers recall the 2014 decision in NLRB v. Noel Canning, in which the U.S. Supreme Court unanimously ruled that Obama’s kangaroo-court “recess appointments”—made when the Senate was not actually in recess—were invalid.

New ruling triples Samsung's damages in smartphone camera case

Jenna Spinelle Sep. 2, 2016, 8:47am

SHERMAN – Electronics giant Samsung now faces triple the originally proposed damages for patent infringement on its mobile phone cameras, according to a ruling issued Aug. 24 in the Sherman Division of the Eastern District of Texas.

Obama seeks second chance for illegal aliens in Texas immigration case

Michelle de Leon Jul. 28, 2016, 11:31am

WASHINGTON – The Obama administration wants to convince the Supreme Court to reconsider the decision in U.S. v. Texas, noting that nine justices must be present in the vote to finalize the ruling.

Future of Texas temporary work permits hinges on Supreme Court ruling

Carrie Salls Jun. 16, 2016, 11:30am

WASHINGTON – Cornell Law School professor Stephen Yale-Loehr believes the upcoming U.S. Supreme Court ruling in a landmark case that will dictate whether President Barack Obama can bypass Congress to defer deportations and grant temporary work permits for millions of undocumented parents will be important for Texas, no matter which way the high court rules.