Stopping a serial suer

There is no absolute right to sue.

Keep this in mind as you consider the inane lawsuit exploits of Amy Modica, oft-chronicled on these pages. Just because someone has the time and temperament to flood our local courts with frivolous claims, doesn't mean it should be allowed.

So far, the leadership of our county courthouse seems content to let Ms. Modica run wild with state authority, lobbing threats in every direction without any concern for repercussions.

Sue you. Sue me. Sue everybody.

When Modica doesn't get her way, she sues. She was back in the news last week, adding two new lawsuits to her busy caseload.

In one, Modica sued Beaumont Bone & Joint Institute for making her walk to a bus stop, among other epic transgressions. The other suit targets two hapless employees of the state Department of Human Services, who tried to help her collect welfare benefits. They're out to get Modica, the lawsuit seems to suggest.

Back in November, it was then-President George W. Bush and the Beaumont Housing Authority, whom she sued for "forcing" her into homelessness. Then it was the unfortunate Dr. Howard Wilcox of Beaumont, sued by Modica last December for being rude during her examination.

Modica claims Wilcox caused her to have a heart attack "right there in his office." She also claims to have suffered emotional distress because she had to ride the bus to and from her appointments with him. She really hates the bus.

In February, Judge Gary Sanderson wisely and quickly dismissed one of her lawsuits alleging that local attorney Frank Calvert verbally assaulted her by employing "sarcasm."

Individuals like Dr. Wilcox shouldn't have to waste time and resources defending against such ridiculous claims. Our judges should take action to require review of her lawsuit claims before she's allowed to file. Such scrutiny, based on Modica's past, is justified.

Why she sues, we don't know.

But we do this: her eccentric legal antics at the Jefferson County Courthouse are costing taxpayers and interfering with the process of justice for legitimate plaintiffs and defendants.

More Stories