Four months after property deed suit filed, plaintiffs obtain declaratory judgment

David Yates Mar. 29, 2011, 3:35am

Four months after filing a lawsuit claiming a Beaumont automotive dealer attempted to illegally transfer land to its name, Glenn Cox and his business obtained a judgment declaring the deed fraudulent.

As previously reported, Cox and Accent on Excellence filed a lawsuit Nov. 12 in Jefferson County District Court against Emily Charrice Schnitz, Avant Schnitz and Avant's Automotive.

In their suit, Cox and Accent alleged they own property at 4880 College St. in Beaumont, which the Schnitzes transferred to themselves.

"On or about February 13, 2008, Mrs. Schnitz executed a Warranty Deed purportedly on behalf of Accent, transferring the property from Accent to Avant's," the suit states.

"Mrs. Schnitz is not the president of Accent, has never been the president of Accent, and had no authority to transfer this property to herself and to Avant's when this Deed was recorded."

On Monday, March 28, Judge Milton Shuffield, 136th District Court, issued a "declaratory judgment declaring that the deed ... is a result of fraud committed by (defendants)," court records show.

Court records also show the defendants never answered the lawsuit.

Judge Shuffield also awarded $3,500.62 in attorney's fees to the plaintiffs.

Wyatt D. Snider, Justin G. Sanderson and Russell W. Heald of Snider and Byrd in Beaumont represented them.

Case No. D188-781

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