SE Texas Record

Monday, November 11, 2019

The Washington Post

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  • The Delusion of Good Faith Judging

    The concept of written legal rules—of the law itself—assumes that their content is fixed and ascertainable. The rule of law likewise depends on citizens having advance notice of what they can and cannot do, pursuant to clear, knowable directives. Legal scholars expend enormous energy pontificating about the appropriate techniques judges should apply in the course of constitutional interpretation: textualism, originalism, and so forth. Libertarian theorists argue strenuously that judges must be given greater authority—through “judicial engagement”—over the political branches. Each day, lawyers across the country trot off to court, briefs in hand, hoping to convince a black-robed judge–enthroned behind a raised, magisterial bench—that the relevant legal rules, properly construed, compel a ruling in favor of their client.

  • Prosecutorial Collusion in the Fourth Estate: Anatomy of a Witch Hunt, Part 4

    Mark Pulliam analyzes the baseless and politically-motivated prosecution of Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton, exploring the disturbing collusion between the news media and the special prosecutors.

  • Citizen journalist arrested for scooping police

    LAREDO – A citizen journalist and blogger was recently arrested for releasing the name of a border patrol agent who committed suicide before the police could put out a press release.

  • Let’s Bust Some 21st Century Trusts

    During the Gilded Age, so-called “captains of industry” such as Andrew Carnegie, John D. Rockefeller, and J.P. Morgan led an industrial revolution that transformed the nation with technological innovation, creating for Americans unparalleled improvements in the average standard of living and amassing great personal fortunes in the process. The spectacular success—and enormous power—of these newly minted tycoons earned them the sobriquet “Robber Baron,” even as their ruthless business tactics, such as Rockefeller’s cartelization of the oil industry through trusts, fostered new laws to regulate anti-competitive business practices, notably the 1890 Sherman Act. These measures are called “antitrust” laws, an often-forgotten tribute to the dynastic Standard Oil Trust, which at its peak controlled the refining of 90 to 95 percent of all oil produced in the United States.

  • If Republicans Really Want to Drain the Swamp, Here’s How to Do It

    On Election Day, the American people made a resounding call to “drain the swamp” that is modern Washington. Yet on Capitol Hill, we seem mired in the same cycle of complacency: The game hasn’t changed, and the players remain the same. Thankfully, there’s a solution available that, while stymied by the permanent political class, enjoys broad public support: congressional term limits.

  • SCOTUS to reviews transgender teen’s bathroom discrimination case

    The Supreme Court of the United States is set to make a decision on the socially divisive issue of bathroom policy involving transgender rights. The outcome of this deliberation is anticipated to affect not only the parties of the case, but also those fighting the same battles across the country.