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Hanszen Laporte to defend $100M free speech case

DENTON - Hanszen Laporte lawyers will take over the defense of a $100,000,000 federal defamation suit filed by Denton attorney Jason Van Dyke against Arizona resident Thomas Retzlaff.

Round Two for Obamacare: Sebelius Redux

Rarely do challengers of landmark legislation get a second bite at the apple in constitutional litigation. Thanks to some enterprising state attorneys general, however, champions of limited government may have another chance to overturn the signature overreach of the Obama Administration. Six years after Obamacare was initially upheld, opponents of the law (technically “The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act,” or “ACA”) are preparing a second test case, based—ironically enough—on the implausible rationale of the initial ruling.

Lino Graglia: The Happy Warrior Soldiers On

My law school years (1977-80) at the University of Texas were, in hindsight, close to idyllic. I loved my first-year professors, tuition at UT was dirt cheap, Austin was a wonderful place to live, and I reveled in the “college town” ambience, which was new to me. (Prior to arriving at UT, I had never attended a college football game. During my first year—when the Longhorns went undefeated in the regular season and Earl Campbell won the Heisman Trophy–I had season tickets on the 50-yard line at UT’s gigantic Memorial Stadium, for a pittance that even a broke law student could afford.) The post-game victory spectacle—honking horns on the Drag and the Tower lit up in orange—formed indelible memories.

Schwarzenegger reportedly in talks with lawyers to sue big oil for climate change, first-degree murder

AUSTIN – Cities and counties apparently aren’t the only ones who want to sue big oil for climate change. On March 11 at the SXSW festival in Austin, Arnold Schwarzenegger said in a Politico podcast that he’s in talks with law firms about suing global oil companies “for knowingly killing people all over the world.”

None Dare Call It Politics: Anatomy of a Witch Hunt, Part 3

On November 4, 2014, when the 51-year-old Ken Paxton was triumphantly elected Attorney General of Texas, defeating his Democrat opponent, the euphoniously named Sam Houston, by over 20 percentage points, the conservative movement in the Lone Star State had a new rising star. Paxton’s enemies were worried; the Tea Party favorite, an impressive University of Virginia law school graduate, seemed bound for the Governor’s mansion, a prospect that made the state’s centrist GOP Establishment aghast. Paxton’s political career had been nothing short of meteoric. First elected to public office in 2002 with the support of grass-roots activists and evangelicals, Paxton represented his suburban Dallas district in the Texas House of Representatives for a decade before winning a coveted promotion to the exclusive 31-member Texas Senate in 2012.

When Cronyism Met Political Correctness at the University of Texas

As an alumnus of the University of Texas Law School and the father of a recent UT graduate, I pay close attention to what is going on at my alma mater. Sadly, I have witnessed at UT many of the ailments afflicting higher education generally: rising tuition, declining academic performance, bloated administrative bureaucracy, curricula infected with identity politics, officious “diversity” enforcers who abuse their authority, and a climate of political correctness that overreacts to every passing fad.

Free Speech for Me, But Not for Thee

I recently attended a panel discussion at my alma mater, the University of Texas in Austin. The topic was “Free Speech on College Campuses: Where to Draw the Line?” The event, held during Free Speech Week, was co-sponsored by UT’s Division of Diversity and Community Engagement (DDCE), the Institute for Urban Policy Research and Analysis (IUPRA), and The Opportunity Forum, all funded in whole or in part by the state of Texas. IUPRA’s mission “is to use applied policy research to advocate for the equality of access, opportunity, and choice for African Americans and other populations of color.”

Consumer sues Capital One for invasion of privacy

HOUSTON — A consumer is suing Capital One Financial Corp., alleging invasion of privacy and telephone harassment

Man alleges slick spot in Houston Lowe's parking lot caused fall

HOUSTON – A Harris County man alleges he was injured at a home improvement store because of the conditions in the parking lot.

Judge: FACT Act would prevent 'abuse' of double-dipping

HOUSTON – Attorneys double-dipping from asbestos trusts funds that rightfully belong to affected veterans is unacceptable, according to a past American Legion National commander and judge.

Selective Outrage

Is Sen. Kamala Harris the victim of partisan politics, or its savvy practitioner and beneficiary?

Customer accuses cabinet manufacturer, Home Depot of breach of warranty

HOUSTON — A Harris County man is suing Home Depot, alleging breach of implied and express warranties.

Libertarian Judicial Activism Isn’t What the Courts Need

Were the Founding Fathers anarchists? Did the ideas contained in John Stuart Mill’s On Liberty, published in 1859, somehow inspire the delegates to the Constitutional Convention in 1787? Does the Constitution contemplate Robert Nozick’s minimal state, presaging his 1974 magnum opus Anarchy, State, and Utopia?

Disabled employee accuses Family Dollar of unlawful termination

BEAUMONT — A disabled Texas worker is suing his former employer, alleging wrongful termination.

Houston hospital pushes forward with plan payment embezzlement allegations

HOUSTON – RedOak Hospital LLC has responded to AT&T Services Inc.’s motion to dismiss a lawsuit related to withheld insurance plan payments, alleging the defendant’s argument “misses the mark because the plans’ anti-assignment provisions are ineffective as a matter of law.”  

Don't Thread on Me

The Texas Supreme Court’s 2015 decision in Patel v. Texas Department of Licensing and Regulation, striking down a state law requiring at least 750 hours of training in order to perform commercial “eyebrow threading”—a form of hair removal mainly performed in South Asian and Middle Eastern communities—has generated substantial notoriety for the court and for the Institute for Justice, which brought the lawsuit challenging the law.

Convention of States group to stream simulation online

DALLAS – A growing movement that calls for a change to the federal government’s powers has been gaining momentum in Texas.

Smith County woman blames Dillard's for fall on broken escalator

MARSHALL — A Smith County woman is suing Dillard's, alleging the defendant's negligence caused the plaintiff is to sustain injuries on an escalator.

Customer blames department store for fall, injuries

HOUSTON — A Dallas County woman is suing a department store operator, alleging negligence caused her to fall and suffer injuries. 

Seaman blames ship owner for his injuries

GALVESTON — A Galveston County man is suing a ship owner, alleging insufficient measures were taken to prevent injuries.