Some people dislike mirrors, because they dislike what they see in them." />

Mirror, mirror, on the wall, who's the fairest of them all?

Some people dislike mirrors, because they dislike what they see in them.

Some people even get angry when they look into mirrors, because they see someone staring back at them who is older, heavier, and less attractive than they believe themselves to be.

This is not a problem for Texans, however. We're fortunate enough to be every bit as good-looking as we think we are.

It's not just individual Texans. The state itself is irresistibly attractive, according to more than 500 of the nation's top CEOs.

In its annual survey of the best and worst states for doing business, ChiefExecutive.net has confirmed, for the seventh year in a row, that Texas is the state that most appeals to productive people.

According to the website's editors, "states with punitive tax and regulatory regimes are punished with lower rankings, and this can offset even positive scores on quality of living environment. While state incentives are always welcome, what CEOs often seek are areas with consistent policies and regulations that allow them to plan, as well as intangible factors such as a state's overall attitude toward business and the work ethic of its population.

"This is one reason Texas has consistently held the No. 1 position since 2005," the editors explain. "It gets strong marks in all areas important for business creation, and has the second-lowest taxes in the nation. The state has created more jobs than any other --about 250,000 last year. Not surprisingly, it also enjoys the highest inward net migration rate of any state."

The only downside for Texas, according to ChiefExecutive.net, is that the influx of job seekers from other states might eventually outstrip the pace of our job creation. That, and the fact that more states are coming to their senses and following our excellent lead is creating competition for us.

We're not worried, though. We'll just make ourselves more attractive.

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