TYLER – Ford Motor Co. has settled a lawsuit filed by the manufacturer of light-emitting diode products, alleging the automaker infringed on one of its patents for LED directional control technology in the headlights of some vehicles.

The settlement with Longview-based Jakuta Diodes LLC was reached after a lawsuit was filed in the Tyler Division of the Eastern District of Texas.

Terms of the settlement were not released. Jakuta Brands is represented by Rasheed McWilliams, Daniel Cotman and Obi Iloputaife, all of Cotman IP Law Group PLC, of Pasadena, California.

The company has filed similar lawsuits in U.S. District Court against General Motors and Honda as well as Acuity Brands, Teledyne Reynolds Inc., Cree Inc., Soraa Inc. and Ledengin Inc.

According to court documents, Jakuta Diodes owns the patent for a device and method for diffusing light. It was issued on June 27, 2000, by the United States Patent and Trademark Office. The patent in suit is U.S. Patent No. 6,079,854 A1.

Ford manufactures vehicles that include LED headlamps that feature the Crystal Diamond Light headlight sold by Jakuta Diodes. They have been used in the F-150, GT and Fusion line of automobiles. The vehicles each use a method of diffusing light, including providing a light source from which light radiates, namely a LED. The headlights interrupt the light with a transparent member, including utilizing a lens with 16 precision optical surfaces and 80 facets.

Additionally, the lights also segregate a substantial portion of the light to a plurality of channels within the member.

The lights also disperse the light transmitted in a widening ray along the plurality of channels utilizing a lens. Jakuta Diodes claimed it would be irreparably harmed by Ford’s alleged infringement of the patent for the light diffusion technology.

According to court documents, the claims of the patent are valid and enforceable.

The company asked the court to require Ford to pay damages, costs, expenses as well as prejudgment and post-judgment interest for the infringement of the patent.

In March, attorneys for Jakuta Diodes filed a joint motion to dismiss with prejudice. The companies agreed, as part of a settlement to be responsible for their own legal fees, costs and expenses, according to court records.




More News