The right to protect ourselves against tyrants

By David Yates | Mar 27, 2018

It's hard to tell sometimes if proponents of gun control are purposely being disingenuous in their arguments or just have zero understanding of the Second Amendment.

It's hard to tell sometimes if proponents of gun control are purposely being disingenuous in their arguments or just have zero understanding of the Second Amendment.

Here's the thing: The U.S. Constitution is not long. You can read it in an hour or two. You can read the Bill of Rights in five minutes. You can read the Second Amendment in 15 seconds. It's only 27 words long.

Get a stopwatch and time it: “A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed.” 

If your grammar school taught American history and civics accurately, and you paid attention, you know that a militia is a group of able-bodied men who show up with their own arms when called upon to defend their community – from raiders, from rioters, and from would-be tyrants.

That’s would-be tyrants like the ones in Waller County who unlawfully banned firearms from their government buildings and then tried to take vindictive legal action against a citizen who challenged their unlawful action.

When Waller County banned licensed gun carriers from bringing firearms into the courthouse, Terry Holcomb, executive director of Texas Carry, wrote a letter to county officials asking them to comply with Texas’ open-carry laws.

When the county responded by suing him, Holcomb alerted State Attorney General Ken Paxton, who filed his lawsuit against the county.

Recently, the First Court of Appeals ruled that Waller County lacks jurisdiction to sue a private citizen for challenging their lawless action.

“Waller County should be embarrassed and ashamed of using litigation as a tool to silence someone who merely called on it to stop violating a state law,” said Paxton.

So it should.

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